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The Revelers

The Revelers

Jun 3, 2016

The Revelers Louisiana supergroup … a tonic of swamp-pop, Cajun, country, blues, and zydeco 2016 GRAMMY Award Nominees: Best Regional Roots Music “Groove bound and dance compelling …” — Offbeat Magazine “There has to be at least one band in the country that reveres the past and is unafraid about dragging it into the future. Mark down the Revelers as that band, musicians who aren’t afraid of mixing up accordion, fiddles, saxophones and guitars. Sometimes the greasiest gumbo can also be the best, as anyone within earshot of this mess will attest. Bon ton all night long.” — The Morton Report – Bentley’s Bandstand The Revelers, founding members of the Red Stick Ramblers and The Pine Leaf Boys — “unquestionably the two groups at the vanguard of the Louisiana cultural renaissance” — have joined together to form a Louisiana supergroup which combines swamp-sop, Cajun, country, blues and zydeco into a powerful tonic of roots music that could only come from southwest Louisiana. As individuals, they are each in high demand having performed and recorded with T-Bone Burnett, Natalie Merchant, Linda Ronstadt, Preston Frank, Walter Mouton, Mamadou Diabate, the Duhks, Cedric Watson, and Tim O’Brien, to name a few. As a group they play with a sense of empathy and depth that can only be fostered after years of making music together. They have all appeared on the 2011 season finale of Anthony Bourdain’s No Reservations, and they also were handpicked by David Simon (producer/creator, The Wire) to be featured musicians for the third and fourth seasons of HBO’s Tremé. Long-time fans of the Red Stick Ramblers may find themselves very familiar with The Revelers: the powerful singing and songwriting of Chas Justus and Eric Frey, a mix of traditional Cajun and zydeco dance music, some of the swing that was such a strong focus of early RSR, the magical rhythm section chemistry of Glenn Fields and Eric Frey, and impressive musical virtuosity across the board. Take what you know about the Red Sticks, add into the mix the crooning vocals of Glenn Fields, and the singing/songwriting of Blake Miller (founding member of the Pine Leaf Boys and unarguably the most prolific French songwriter coming...

SONSBEEK 16 | transACTION

SONSBEEK 16 | transACTION

May 31, 2016

SONSBEEK is back! The eleventh edition of the contemporary art exhibition is curated by the Indonesian collective ruangrupa and takes place from 4 June to 18 September 2016 in Park Sonsbeek, the city of Arnhem and Museum Arnhem in the Netherlands. An exhibition route connects the heritage of the last ten editions with new works: the city, the park and venues such as Museum Arnhem and Kröller-Müller Museum contain many memorable art works from SONSBEEK’s rich history. SONSBEEK ’16: transACTION launches the new quadrennial cycle: SONSBEEK will appear every four years. SONSBEEK ’16 is compiled by curatorial collective ruangrupa (Jakarta, Indonesia), whose approach to art and social themes stems from a social and personal perspective. The selection of artists is characterised by an emphasis on the interaction between artists, residents and audiences. These interactions create a new perspective on social issues concerning us all. Park The first installations will be set up in Park Sonsbeek in May, hosting a range of activities throughout the exhibition to stimulate and engage visitors. These installations are new meeting venues for people meet and linger in the park and available for everyone to use. Park Sonsbeek features site-specific work by Richard Bell (Brisbane, Australia), Maze de Boer (Amsterdam, Netherlands), Rossella Biscotti (Molfetta, Italy), Kevin van Braak (Arnhem, Netherlands), Louie Cordero (Manila, Philippines), Cinema Caravan (Nagoya, Japan), Shilpa Gupta (Mumbai, India), Folkert de Jong (Amsterdam, Netherlands), KUNSTrePUBLIK (Berlin, Germany), Eko Prawoto (Yogyakarta, Indonesia), Slavs & Tatars (Berlin, Germany) and Rob Voerman (Arnhem, Netherlands). Museum SONSBEEK ’16 includes an exhibition at Museum Arnhem: transHISTORY. Ruangrupa is interested in personal histories, especially stories relating to Dutch colonial history. Art works in the museum show that history is not static, it continually develops and forms part of everyday life and reality. For transHISTORY, Eva Kotatkova (Prague, Czech Republic) and Agung Kurniawan (Jakarta, Indonesia) create site-specific work. The presentation includes work by Tiffany Chung (Ho Chi Minh city, Vietnam), Zbigniew Libera (Warsaw, Poland), Charles Lim (Singapore), Tayeba Lipi (Dhaka, Bangladesh), Otobong Nkanga (Kano, Nigeria), Jean-Gabriel Périot (Les Lilas, France), Marco Paulo Rolla (São Paulo, Brazil) and Roy Villevoye (Amsterdam, Netherlands). City Arnhem’s city centre is also a main venue for SONSBEEK ’16: transACTION. Collaborations...

SONSBEEK 16 | transACTION

SONSBEEK 16 | transACTION

May 29, 2016

SONSBEEK is back! The eleventh edition of the contemporary art exhibition is curated by the Indonesian collective ruangrupa and takes place from 4 June to 18 September 2016 in Park Sonsbeek, the city of Arnhem and Museum Arnhem in the Netherlands. An exhibition route connects the heritage of the last ten editions with new works: the city, the park and venues such as Museum Arnhem and Kröller-Müller Museum contain many memorable art works from SONSBEEK’s rich history. SONSBEEK ’16: transACTION launches the new quadrennial cycle: SONSBEEK will appear every four years. SONSBEEK ’16 is compiled by curatorial collective ruangrupa (Jakarta, Indonesia), whose approach to art and social themes stems from a social and personal perspective. The selection of artists is characterised by an emphasis on the interaction between artists, residents and audiences. These interactions create a new perspective on social issues concerning us all. Park The first installations will be set up in Park Sonsbeek in May, hosting a range of activities throughout the exhibition to stimulate and engage visitors. These installations are new meeting venues for people meet and linger in the park and available for everyone to use. Park Sonsbeek features site-specific work by Richard Bell (Brisbane, Australia), Maze de Boer (Amsterdam, Netherlands), Rossella Biscotti (Molfetta, Italy), Kevin van Braak (Arnhem, Netherlands), Louie Cordero (Manila, Philippines), Cinema Caravan (Nagoya, Japan), Shilpa Gupta (Mumbai, India), Folkert de Jong (Amsterdam, Netherlands), KUNSTrePUBLIK (Berlin, Germany), Eko Prawoto (Yogyakarta, Indonesia), Slavs & Tatars (Berlin, Germany) and Rob Voerman (Arnhem, Netherlands). Museum SONSBEEK ’16 includes an exhibition at Museum Arnhem: transHISTORY. Ruangrupa is interested in personal histories, especially stories relating to Dutch colonial history. Art works in the museum show that history is not static, it continually develops and forms part of everyday life and reality. For transHISTORY, Eva Kotatkova (Prague, Czech Republic) and Agung Kurniawan (Jakarta, Indonesia) create site-specific work. The presentation includes work by Tiffany Chung (Ho Chi Minh city, Vietnam), Zbigniew Libera (Warsaw, Poland), Charles Lim (Singapore), Tayeba Lipi (Dhaka, Bangladesh), Otobong Nkanga (Kano, Nigeria), Jean-Gabriel Périot (Les Lilas, France), Marco Paulo Rolla (São Paulo, Brazil) and Roy Villevoye (Amsterdam, Netherlands). City Arnhem’s city centre is also a main venue for SONSBEEK ’16: transACTION. Collaborations...

At San Franciscos Museum of Modern Art, a New Frontier for Photography

At San Franciscos Museum of Modern Art, a New Frontier for Photography

May 21, 2016

Snøhetta expansion of the new SFMOMA, opening May 14, 2016 © Henrik Kam. Courtesy SFMOMA When SFMOMA reopens next month, the new Pritzker Center for Photography will become the largest photography showcase in an American art museum. The center will have double the original gallery space and new, state-of-the-art educational and storage facilities. At the heart of one of the nation’s leading fine art institutions, photography will take center stage. Glen Helfand recently spoke with senior curator Sandra Phillips about the Pritzker Center and upcoming exhibitions at SFMOMA. Glen Helfand: How much discussion was there about the importance of photography as a medium in terms of its prime location in the museum? Sandra Phillips: There’s a considerable group of Trustees who are committed to photography. I know that photography was something that SFMOMA director Neal Benezra and the Trustees were eager to present in an important and focused way in the enlarged museum, and it’s something we’ve stood for since the museum was founded in the 1930s. We have been very photography-oriented because it’s been our important community, both historically and now. Lewis Baltz, Claremont, 1973 © Estate of Lewis Baltz. Courtesy SFMOMA Helfand: What exactly is the Pritzker Center for Photography? Phillips: It comprises the old galleries in the Botta Building that now showcase the permanent collection. It includes the Photography Interpretation Galleries, which will also include a coffee bar. And it includes the Temporary Exhibition galleries for photography, where we will present our own shows and those from other institutions. Finally it will also include the collection itself, the study room, a classroom, and two offices. Helfand: What aspects are you most excited about? Phillips: I think the whole thing as a unit, which unites the study of the original objects in the study room with work being shown in the galleries, together with an in-depth concentration on our permanent collection and a creative use of it. It will enable us to bring in more shows from other institutions. We will also be developing our archives and making all that accessible. The whole thing is like a dream come true. Seiichi Furuya, Izu, 1978, from the series Portrait of Christine, 1978 © Seiichi Furuya....

Announcement // Chinese Art: From Painting to Digital at Migrant Birds

Announcement // Chinese Art: From Painting to Digital at Migrant Birds

May 17, 2016

Article by Julianne Cordray in Berlin // Tuesday, May 10, 2016 Four emerging artists grapple with the pervasiveness of digital media and the Internet as technologies of representation in Chinese Art: From Painting to Digital at Migrant Birds Art Space. Interacting on a personal level with materials of recent technology that otherwise evince uniformity—through knowledge that transcends cultural and geographical borders—Feng Chen, Huang Siying, Liao Wenfeng and Shi Zheng encapsulate the interchange between traditional representational modes and those currently generated through experimentation in the digital realm. Liao Wenfeng: ‘A Match Man in the Darkness’, 24 x 32 cm, Watercolor and Indian ink on MDF Representative of the prevalence of video, sound and multimedia in contemporary art discourse, their work reveals impressions of the ‘traditional’ embedded in the theoretical foundations of new technologies—ultimately complicating definitions of newness and conventionality. Video and multimedia artist Feng Chen was born in Wuhan and graduated from the China Academy of Art (CAA) in 2006. His work explores the manipulative potential of media by reconstituting images of the familiar and destabilizing techniques of representation. Framing incongruity through desynchronization, he engages the senses and diverse temporalities to examine effects of simultaneity and processes of influence and exchange. Portrait of Feng Chen Melding various scientific theories and the philosophical concepts of Gilles Deleuze, artist and designer Huang Siying’s new media work spans traditional and recent methods of pattern visualization and mapping. Emerging from a multidisciplinary approach, her imaging techniques disclose current processes of digitalization—not only at work within the production of images, but underlying the human gaze that perceives them. Portrait of Huang Siying Berlin-based artist and curator Liao Wenfeng was born in Jiangxi Province and graduated from the China Academy of Art (CAA) in 2006. He has exhibited in China and Europe, and has held Artist-in-Residence positions in Zurich and Helsinki. His work interconnects art and scientific study, developing visual traces of the systems of circulation operating within natural phenomena and everyday processes. Portrait of Liao Wenfeng Exploring the interrelationship between sensory experiences that manifest in the topography of virtual space, Shi Zheng employs an experimental approach that traverses video, music and performance. A graduate of China Academy of Art’s (CAA) Institute for Intermedia Art (2014), he has exhibited...

From the Archives Weaving, Not Cloth: Mark Bradford at SFMOMA

From the Archives Weaving, Not Cloth: Mark Bradford at SFMOMA

May 9, 2016

We always like to see artist Mark Bradford’s name pop up in the press. Of course, there’s the fantastic news that Bradford will be representing the U.S. in this year’s Venice Biennale, in addition to last week’s cheekily delivered critique of art auctions (while onsite at Christie’s). Today, we’re republishing Bean Gilsdorf’s meditations on the tactility of Bradford’s work in relation to textiles. This article was originally published on March 6, 2012. Mark Bradford, Potable Water, 2005; billboard paper, photomechanical reproductions, acrylic gel medium, and additional mixed media; 130 x 196 inches; collection of Hunter Gray; © Mark Bradford; photo: Bruce M. White The difficulty in viewing photographs of artwork is that the camera flattens the object in its focus, relinquishing subtleties in order to capture a whole. Because his oeuvre is very subtle indeed, Mark Bradford’s work requires a viewer’s presence to be fully appreciated. Very little of the slender lines of collage, delicate papers built up in thin layers or washes of paint almost completely sanded away is apparent in reproduction. Each of the more than forty of Bradford’s works now on view at SFMOMA calls out to be felt, if not by the hand of the viewer then by the eye. They elicit a state of tactile vision, a reminder that visual perception is also connected to the faculty of touch. In the scholarship regarding his work, much has been made of the condition and location of Bradford’s studio practice.* He grew up (and still lives) in South Central Los Angeles, a mainly black neighborhood mythologized for its urban decay. Bradford worked at his mother’s hair salon before attending art school, learning skills that he would adapt to his practice: hard work, repetitive actions and tactile processes. He gleans his materials from the posters, billboard papers, and hair salon permanent-wave end papers that are still part of his environment. And while all this information surely contributes to an important analysis of his work based in socio-economics, race and culture, it ignores the physicality and lushness of the actual surfaces and the connection of Bradford’s work to textiles. Mark Bradford, Value 47, 2009–10. Billboard paper, photomechanical reproductions, acrylic gel medium, carbon paper,...