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Volvo Cars and Geely to establish JV to boost synergies, accelerate next-gen electrified vehicle technology

Volvo Cars and Geely to establish JV to boost synergies, accelerate next-gen electrified vehicle technology

Jul 23, 2017

Volvo Cars plans to set up a new joint venture technology company with Geely Holding, the Chinese car group, to share existing and future technology, to deepen industrial synergies and to provide the economies of scale that will allow them to develop next generation electrified vehicle technology more rapidly. According to a Memorandum of Understanding signed today, Volvo Cars, Geely Auto and LYNK & CO will share vehicle architecture and engine technologies via cross licensing arrangements of technologies managed by the new joint venture. They will also cooperate more deeply by commonly sourcing components and cutting procurement costs. Volvo Cars, Geely Auto and LYNK & CO are controlled by Geely Holding, the Chinese car group. The new joint venture will be 50/50 owned by Volvo Cars and Geely Holding and be headquartered in China with a subsidiary in Gothenburg, Sweden. Partnerships to share know-how and technologies are common practice in the automotive industry. This is the model we are adopting. This planned collaboration will strengthen Volvo’s ability to develop next generation electrified cars. —Håkan Samuelsson, president and chief executive Volvo Cars and Geely already share technology, most notably the Compact Modular Architecture (CMA) which is being used by Volvo Cars for its soon-to-be-announced smaller range of 40 series cars and by LYNK & CO. The intellectual property rights for the technology to be shared will remain with the company that developed it, but the technology itself will be available for use by Volvo, Geely Auto and LYNK & CO, via license agreements. Future modular vehicle architectures and other technology will be shared and developed based on cost sharing agreements. The company leading the development will own the technology and the other group companies will have full access to it through a license, reducing overall development costs. The partners expect that the collaboration will extend in future to also cover electrified vehicle components such as battery cells, e-motors and charging systems in order to maximize synergies across the group. Separately, Volvo is taking a significant minority shareholding in LYNK & CO. This stake reflects the fact that LYNK & CO will benefit from the use of Volvo technology both now and in the future. LYNK...

Mysterious Korean Word:

Mysterious Korean Word:

Apr 2, 2017

Korean culture is more community focused, and this strong sense of collectivism is deeply permeated in the Korean language. If you study Korean, you will hear “ 우리_____” on a daily basis. Direct translation of “우리” is “we” or “our” in English. However, this is one of those Korean words you often do not want to translate literally. For example, what does “우리 아내” and “우리 남편” mean? Its direct translation would be “our wife” and “our husband” in English. Your response may be something like this: “Uh~, isn’t monogamy the legal practice in Korea?” You might find that these Korean expressions seem quiet strange to your ears. In many cases, you cannot directly translate the meaning of “우리” as “our” in English. “우리 아내” and “우리 남편” actually mean “my wife” and “my husband” in English. Why is this Korean word “우리” deeply permeated in the Korean language? Korean culture emphasizes the value of the group that a person belongs to, whether it is a person’s country, family, school, society, neighbor, hometown, etc. Koreans see these groups as a single entity. This aspect of collectivism has a huge impact on the way Koreans behave and speak. This Korean word “우리” would make sense to you only if you consider these aspects of Korean culture. Because Koreans value a group mindset, they generally use “우리” instead of “my” when they refer to people and things they are related to. Here are some examples that you will frequently hear from Korean speakers: This article, Mysterious Korean Word: , first appeared on Korean Language...

Feeling Sick or Hurt???

Feeling Sick or Hurt???

Mar 19, 2017

No one wants to get sick! However, when sicknesses take you by surprise, the following common expressions will help you to describe general aches and pains in Korean. This article, Feeling Sick or Hurt???, first appeared on Korean Language...

How far is the Pushkar Fair?

How far is the Pushkar Fair?

Oct 24, 2016

The mention of Pushkar Mela (fair) usually generates an excited buzz in travelers to India. Domestic and foreign tourists alike visit the fair for a glimpse and experience of Rajasthan’s intense colors and customs. This article, How far is the Pushkar Fair?, first appeared on Hindi Language...

A Pope, a Dog, and a Venn Diagram: Sermon for Pentecost 12, RCL Proper 14C (7 August 2016)

A Pope, a Dog, and a Venn Diagram: Sermon for Pentecost 12, RCL Proper 14C (7 August 2016)

Aug 11, 2016

==================== A homily offered by the Rev. Dr. C. Eric Funston on the Twelfth Sunday after Pentecost, August 7, 2016, to the people of St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, Medina, Ohio, where Fr. Funston is rector. (The lessons for the day are Proper 14C of the Revised Common Lectionary: Genesis 15:1-6; Psalm 33:12-22; Hebrews 11:1-3,8-16; and St. Luke 12:32-40. These lessons may be found at The Lectionary Page.) ==================== In your bulletins this week, I have added three pictures to illustrate this sermon. These pictures kept coming back to mind as I read and re-read the lessons. The pictures are as follows: A photograph of Pope John Paul II’s arrival in Managua, Nicaragua, on July 5, 1983. Fr. Ernesto Cardenal, who served in the Nicaraguan government as Minister of Culture, kneels before the Pope who is wagging his finger at him. One of my favorite cartoons, a four-panel Peanuts offering first published on August 9, 1976, in which the beagle Snoopy is writing a book of theology with the planned title “Has It Ever Occurred to You That You Might Be Wrong?” A generic Venn diagram I will refer to these pictures later in the sermon. Most exegeses of today’s Genesis text focus on the last sentence, “And [Abraham] believed the Lord; and the Lord reckoned it to him as righteousness,” and treat this story as one of faith. But, in all honesty, this is a story of doubt. It is the story of Abraham questioning God’s promise of a posterity; it is a story of tribalism and concern for bloodline, ethnicity, and inheritance. We humans have a predisposition to tribalism, to congregating in social groupings of similar people. I was at a continuing education event this week in which one of the exercises explored the issue of economic segregation in our society; the facilitator asked each of us to describe the home in which we live and the neighborhood and community within which it is situated. One of the uniform characteristics was that no matter what our race or ethnic type might have been, our home neighborhoods were made up of people for the most part similar to ourselves. We in modern 21st Century...